City of Greenville, NC

 

Greenville Animal Control Unit

 

 

 

Chief

Chief
Chief
Chief
 

The Greenville Animal Control Unit operates within the Code Enforcement Division of the Greenville Police Department. Duties include enforcing the City of Greenville's Animal Control Ordinances, educating the public on proper animal control responsibilities, and investigating animal cruelty, dog bites/animal attacks, and vicious dogs.

   
   

Mission Statement

 

The mission of Greenville Animal Control Unit is to provide the citizens of Greenville with effective and cost-efficient Animal Control services through the active enforcement of state and local laws, and the promotion of responsible pet ownership and animal welfare.

The primary objective of animal control employees is to provide quality service to the citizens, while dedicating themselves to improving the co-existence of animals and humans.

 
     
     

Lost Pets or Animals Picked Up by Animal Control

 
 

If your pet is lost, please call Greenville Animal Control at 329-4387. We will log your pet in our missing pet database and we will also patrol your neighborhood for your lost pet when feasible. Chances are, we may already have your pet or have spoken to someone who has found your pet.

In addition to contacting us about your lost pet, you should also contact the Pitt County Animal Shelter at 252-902-1725 to see if someone took your pet there.

 

Please do not hesitate, because space at the Pitt County Animal Shelter is limited and state law only requires the shelter to hold a stray animal for 72 hours.

REMEMBER TO PUT AN ID TAG ALONG WITH THE RABIES TAG ON YOUR PET'S COLLAR TO HELP US REUNITE YOU WITH YOUR PET. YOU NEVER KNOW WHEN YOUR PET MIGHT GET LOST!

 
 

Off Leash Dog Area

The City of Greenville's first Off Leash Dog Area opened to the public in August 2007 at 1703 River Drive in the Tar River Neighborhood. We need your help and support to keep the park clean and safe for dogs and their owners. When you visit, please abide by all posted rules and let the Animal Control Unit know immediately if there is a problem. See the Off-Leash Dog Area website for more information and directions. 

  
 
 

Animal Control Staff: 

     
Animal Control Supervisor Tim Langley
     

Animal Control Supervisor Tim Langley is the senior Animal Control Officer for the Greenville Police Department. Officer Langley is a nationally certified Animal Control Officer. Officer Langley serves as expert in Felony Animal Fighting, and an Advanced Animal Cruelty Investigator for the state of North Carolina. He is also a member of the “North Carolina Task Force to Abolish Animal Fighting”.  Officer Langley is a member of the State Animal Response Team (SART).

Officer Langley is a 24 year veteran with the Greenville Police Department. If you would like a presentation for your organization please call 252-329-4387 or contact Officer Langley by email.

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Ride-Along Program

 

 

The Greenville Police Department is a community-oriented department and we encourage citizens to participate in our Ride-Along Program. If you would like to be considered as a ride-along participant with an Animal Control Officer, please contact us at 252-329-4387.

 
 

Greenville Animal Control
500 South Greene Street
Greenville, NC 27834
Phone: 252-329-4387
Emergency Phone: 252-329-4300
 
Email: TLangley@greenvillenc.gov 

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Illegal Animal Fighting and Animal Cruelty

North Carolina General Statute 14-362.2 makes it a felony in the state of North Carolina to fight, instigate, conduct, promote, or allow a dog for the purposes of illegal dog fighting. If you suspect dog fighting in your neighborhood, please contact our office or the Greenville Police Department directly and we will follow up on your complaint. Also, the Humane Society of the United States offers up to a $2500.00 reward for information leading to the arrest and conviction of persons involved in dog fighting.

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Neighborhood Watch for Animals Campaign

     

Greenville Animal Control has partnered with the Humane Society of the United States to help establish a neighborhood watch for animals. This is part of the “FIRST STRIKE” program established by the Humane Society. This program has been highly effective in other communities. 

Here is how to help with our new neighborhood watch campaign for animals:

     
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KNOW YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD’S PETS 

     
   

In a perfect world no pets would be out on their own roaming the neighborhood. But unfortunately, some dogs and cats escape or are allowed to roam unsupervised. The more you know about the animals who live in your neighborhood, the more you’re able to help. Pay attention to the dogs and cats that live around you. When you see an animal out alone, you will more likely know who to contact or how to get the animal home.  

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PAY ATTENTION TO ABUSE AND NEGLECT 

     
   

A dog left chained outside without food, water, or shelter; a sick or injured animal whose condition goes untreated; a house teeming with cats; an animal showing obvious signs of abuse; or a neighbor child who throws rocks at squirrels, all are examples of neglect and abuse that put animals in danger. You can help by being observant. Is the situation getting worse? If you see an act of overt cruelty or neglect, call Animal Control or Police immediately.

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WATCH FOR PETS IN PARKED CARS

     
   

A pet left in a parked car can be in danger, especially in warm weather. On a warm day, the temperature in a parked car can reach over 100 degrees in a matter of minutes, even with the windows partially open. A pet can easily suffer heatstroke, or suffocate and die. If you see a pet can be in danger as well.

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HELP THE ELDERLY

     
   

Companion animals can play very important roles in the lives of elderly people. However, they can also be a hardship for those who love them while having trouble providing essential pet care. Offer to assist by walking dogs, cleaning litter boxes, feeding pets, or taking pets to the veterinarian. If you notice that an elderly neighbor’s pet is suddenly left outside or appears to be sick, take note. It can be a sign that your neighbor is unable to care for the animal. Contact Police and Animal Control if you suspect such issues.

      
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Last Modified: 9/10/2013
 
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